motherboard

by Don_Caldwell on Monday, Nov 01, 2010

Limewire may be dead, but if you are in NYC you can still share files, and you don’t even need to connect to the Internet.

 

In this Motherboard.tv episode, artist Jamie O'Shea from Substitute Materials shows how you can build a telegraph from materials that were readily available 50,000 years ago: "It's the ultimate salvagepunk experiment, a DIY exploration of what makes innovation possible, and an attempt to prove that the future could happen at any time (even if the world isn't always ready for it)."
featured by Cory Doctorow

 

Jamie O'Shea's Immaculate Telegraphy: How One Man Built a Telegraph Using Only Stone Age Materials on Motherboard, Oct 2010Jamie O'Shea's Immaculate Telegraphy: How One Man Built a Telegraph Using Only Stone Age Materials on Motherboard, Oct 2010

 

After realizing that calculus and engineering weren’t exactly her style, Diana Eng decided to put her quantitative talents to work elsewhere: in the fashion industry.

 
Shared by reBlog @ Eyebeam

This week Cory Arcangel invites us for a peep behind-the-scenes to see how his inimitable brand of internet-infused, code-heavy art gets made. Cory’s one of those rare artists who knows how to make digital art with heart and flesh and soul. With a catalog of work that often celebrates the unfiltered human weirdness and beauty piped to our homes as the internet, the conversation returns several times to the World Wide Web. When we ask Cory for a run down of his favorite internet videos, he shows us a few awesome ones—like this and this. We talk about his earliest work, the now infamous Super Mario Clouds, and the treatise he wrote on jpeg compression. Cory plays us part of his latest piece, a recreation of Arnold Schoenberg’s 1999 op. 11 Drei Klavierstücke comprised entirely of Youtube clips with cats playing piano. And for anybody out there making art as you watch along at home: Cory even gives some great encouragement and advice about the art making process.

 
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