global warming

Book Details
Format: 
Hardcover, 96 pages.
Publication Date: 
September 2007
ISBN: 
9780262050890
Category: 
Science
In Stock: 
yes
Order: 
bookstore@eyebeam.org

The vast majority of scientists agree that human activity has significantly increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere—most dramatically since the 1970s. In February 2007 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that global warming is "unequivocal" and that human-produced carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are chiefly to blame, to a certainty of more than 90 percent. Yet global warming skeptics and ill-informed elected officials continue to dismiss this broad scientific consensus. In What We Know About Climate Change, MIT atmospheric scientist Kerry Emanuel outlines the basic science of global warming and how the current consensus has emerged. Although it is impossible to predict exactly when the most dramatic effects of global warming will be felt, he argues, we can be confident that we face real dangers.

 

In the running up to the climate summit in Copenhagen, we’re featuring two approaches to the subject.

1. One approach to the subject is an installation by Petko Dourmana which “portrays a dystopian scenario: a “nuclear winter” initiated by political groups or governments in order to solve the problem of global warming and the melting of the polar icecaps.” Using night vision goggles and infrared projections one can navigate the dark post-apocalyptic north pole. It suggested a future where we may be blind without technology and thus highlighting the contradiction this dependance has been created by unchecked technology and its subsequent damage to the environment. Part of Transmediale ‘09.

 
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