ecology

Start Date: 
21 Apr 2012
Hours: 
3PM-7PM open exhibit, 7PM-9PM panel
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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On April 21st, Eyebeam's main exhibition space will be transformed into a small village dedicated to creative sound research. Using resources as diverse as atmospheric sensors, ping-pong balls, string instruments, reverberant plates, magnetized wires, cell phones, data hubs, and laughter, participants from Eyebeam's sound research group will convene to run experiments, share original research, develop work in progress, and explore collaborative strategies.

Interaction, encounter, and juxtaposition will be emphasized over sound isolation—the idea being that sound is transparent enough to permit a human ecology that transcends the singular focus of the concert format.

From 3PM-7PM the public will be invited to witness the results. The day will culminate in a public discussion at 7PM.

 
People: Alan Sondheim, Azure Carter, Ben Houge, Bernhard Garnicnig, Brian House, Chris Diasparra, Christine Sun-Kim, David Reeder, Jackson Moore, Keiko Uenishi, Kyle Kessler, Mary Mattingly, Mike Clemow, Roddy Schrock, Seth Dellinger, Yo Park
Research: Sound
Tags: critical mass, ecology, sound, sound art, sound ecology, sound research
Hours: 
12:00PM-6:00PM
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Eyebeam presents a new work from Superfund365: Photo Series by Fellow Brooke Singer in the Bookstore Gallery, March 22-April 30. Gowanus Canal, Brookyln, NY is a large-format photograph taken at a recently designated Superfund site. Singer's online data visualization project Superfund365 highlighted a different Superfund site (or the most contaminated sites as designated by the EPA) every day in 2007.

 
Book Details
Format: 
Paperback, 80 pages
Publication Date: 
July 2008
ISBN: 
9781906155117
Category: 
Science
In Stock: 
yes
Order: 
bookstore@eyebeam.org

As the environment becomes more fragile, existing transportation networks are more and more strained. Issues such as food miles and embodied energy in goods and products will become far more significant. Personal carbon quotas are likely to force a re-evaluation of our current lifestyles and single trips will carry greater levels of expectation. Casual long distance travel may be socially decried.

Edge Futures are a series of five books that explore the impact that climate change will have on different aspects of our lives in the future. They are available to order as individual titles or as a complete set.

The Edge is an innovative and creative think-tank, sponsored by building industry professions, that seeks to stimulate public interest in policy questions that affect the built environment and to inform and influence public opinion.

 
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The New York Public Interest Research Group (NYPIRG) is New York State's largest student-directed consumer, environmental and government reform organization. They are a nonpartisan, not-for-profit group established to effect policy reforms while training students and other New Yorkers to be advocates. Since 1973, NYPIRG has played the key role in fighting for more than 120 public interest laws and executive orders.

 

 
Book Details
Format: 
paperback, 153 pages
Publication Date: 
June 2002
ISBN: 
9780917562747
Category: 
Exhibition Catalog
In Stock: 
yes

Coined in 1999, the term ecovention (ecology + invention) describes an artist initiated project that employs an inventive strategy to physically transform an ecosystem. This exciting publication has been designed and written to attract a diverse audience. Ecovention juxtaposes interesting ecological facts alongside case studies of projects artists have realized, in tandem with scientists and community members. Active ecovention sites that span the globe, from Australia to Kenya and Italy to the United States are documented in this book. This is a refreshing look into how artistic ideas can be combined with the sciences to create a healthier and more meaningful world!

 
People: Sue Spaid
Research: Sustainability
Tags: ecology
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Wish You Were Here was a site-specific installation by Addie Wagenknecht, Production Lab Fellow, installed on April 3, 2008, in the Northwest corner of Clement Clarke Moore Park, located at 22nd and 10th Aves.

A flock of stark, white, static two-dimensional birds inhabited a tree. The birds’ physical negatives were modeled on the actual species that once inhabited Manhattan. According to a recent Audubon Society report, 20 species of birds are declining at a rate of 68 percent.

Project Created: 
April 2008
 
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