UWAC

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MetaFlora is to bring life to things that cannot sustain life. It is a flower-powered statement that comments on the absence of nature in the streets of New York City.

An urban street intervention developed for UWAC Day, the student residents, along with Doris Cacolio, Sonali Sridhar, and window farmer Maya Nayak came up with the idea of MetaFlora. Each MetaFlora flower has seedpods in the middle of blossoms crafted from newspaper and crepe paper; they were designed to support plant life where plant life does not grow. The newspaper acts as a semi-porous shell to hold moisture for the seed-pod, and the colorful crepe paper attracts passersby to take a closer look: the miracle of life happening on the side of a building, on construction scaffolding, and even on road blocks.

Project Created: 
March 2010
 

Amanda McDonald Crowley, executive director of Eyebeam, New York City's non-profit art and technology center, will explore some of the work artists are doing on food and sustainability issues in a talk on Thursday, April 1, at the Burchfield Penney Art Center.

 
Projects: Electrosmog
Tags: education, safari7, Electrosmog, UWAC, eyebeam

The Urban Wilderness Action Center (UWAC) is a project initiated by Jon Cohrs, in collaboration with the Eyebeam Student Residents (New York), Stephanie Pereira, and UK-based artist Kai-Oi Jay Yung (UK). The UWAC project includes a web platform uwac.anewfuckingwilderness.com and a day of action where people from NYC, Berlin, and London will design and disseminate guerrilla gardening projects.

UWAC DAY is Saturday, March 20. Each of four lead cities will host a day of free artist-led interventions that respond to urban wilderness. We will document the day through a live Twitter, Flickr, and video feed streamed through the UWAC website.

 

As part of the Urban WIlderness Action Center, Myriel Milicevic + Jon Cohrs are organizing the Berlin Micro-Turf Expedition. With a team of self-defined experts (you), we will survey parking lot ecosystems, abandoned infrastructures, trade routes, and micro habitats of Berlin by dissecting the fringe-ecologies within the city.

The expedition will report back live to the ElectroSmog festival with its band of specialists who will setup up camp in several different areas in Berlin.

 
Projects: Urban Wilderness Action Center
People: Jon Cohrs
Tags: UWAC, sustainability, Festival of Sustainable Immobility, Electrosmog

Eyebeam will be participating in ElectroSmog, a new festival that revolves around the concept of Sustainable Immobility. The festival, which takes place simultaneously at many locations around the world, will introduce and explore the concept of sustainable immobility in both theory and practice, with discussions, workshops, and performances taking place at each of the festival partners' home bases.

Eyebeam will run two events on Saturday, March 20:

 
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Eyebeam will be participating in ElectroSmog, a new festival that revolves around the concept of Sustainable Immobility. The festival, which takes place simultaneously at many locations around the world, will introduce and explore the concept of sustainable immobility in both theory and practice, with discussions, workshops, and performances taking place at each of the festival partners' home bases.

 

 

Eyebeam will run two events on Saturday, March 20:

 
Start Date: 
20 Mar 2010
Hours: 
1PM–6PM
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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The Urban Wilderness Action Center (UWAC) is a project initiated by Eyebeam alum Jon Cohrs, in collaboration with the Eyebeam Student Residents, Eyebeam education coordinator Stephanie Pereira, and UK-based artist Kai-Oi Jay Yung. The UWAC project includes a web platform uwac.anewfuckingwilderness.com and a day of action where people from NYC, Berlin, Amsterdam and London will design and disseminate projects around the theme of "urban wilderness."

UWAC DAY is Saturday, March 20. Each of four lead cities will host a day of free artist-led interventions that respond to urban wilderness. We will document the day through a live Twitter, Flickr, and video feed streamed through the UWAC website.

 

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