feedback

 
People: David Benjamin, Soo-in Yang
Research: Sustainability
Tags: architecture, feedback, Open City, sustainability
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Each day for a year, starting on September 1, 2007, Superfund365 visited one toxic site in the Superfund program run by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). We began the journey in the New York City area and worked our way across the country, ending the year in Hawaii.

Today the archive consists of 365 visualizations of some of the worst toxic sites in the U.S., roughly a quarter of the total number on the Superfund's National Priorities List (NPL). Along the way, we wrote an email update with highlights and conducted video interviews.

Project Created: 
September 2007
 
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Eve Mosher is an artist and interventionist living and working in New York City. Her works use investigations of the landscape as starting points for audience exploration of urban issues. Her public works raise issues of involvement in the environment, public/private space use, history of place, cultural and social issues and our own understanding of the urban ecosystem. Her work has been profiled in international media including the New York Times, ARTnews and Le Monde. She has received grants from New York State Council on the Arts, the New York Department of Cultural Affairs and The City Parks Foundation. www.evemosher.com

Eyebeam CV
2009FExhibiting Artist
SInternExhibiting Artist
2008FExhibiting ArtistIntern
SExhibiting ArtistIntern
 
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Working across media and disciplines, Brooke Singer creates platforms for local knowledge to connect, inform and conflict with official data descriptions. She engages technoscience as an artist, educator, nonspecialist and collaborator. Her work lives “on” and “off” line in the form of websites, workshops, photography, maps, installations and performances that involves public participation in pursuit of social change. She is co-founder of the art, technology and activist group, Preemptive Media and a professor of New Media at Purchase College, State University of New York.

Eyebeam CV
2011F
SFellow
2010FFellow
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(see all rows)
2009F
S
2008F
SExhibiting Artist
 
Start Date: 
26 Jan 2008
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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To close the FEEDBACK preview exhibition, the Open Source Sustainability Critique on Saturday January 26, from 4–6PM invites you to bring your own projects up for review with Eyebeam alumni artists. Ten projects will be selected for critique from an open call of projects.

How to submit a project for consideration:

Send a brief (2–3 sentence) description of the work, plus any URLs that show the project and/or documentation. The content of your project or the materials used to make your project should address issues or concepts related to sustainability.

To submit a project for consideration, please email Liz Slagus, Director of Education and Public Programming: liz AT eyebeam DOT org

The deadline for submission is Tuesday, January 22 at 6PM.

The Open Source Sustainability Critique is a sustainable review of projects lead by artists participating in the upcoming exhibition, FEEDBACK (March 13 – April 19).

 
Start Date: 
29 Mar 2008
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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What if walls could breathe? On Saturday, March 29, 2008, Eyebeam presented a panel and showcase on architecture and sustainability as part of its Feedback exhibition.

In the past 15 years, some of the most vibrant experiments in architecture have used computer technologies to:

  1. develop new types of geometries, with curves, facets, and non-standard shapes
  2. fabricate architectural elements directly from digital files without working drawings.

Recently, some architects have been using new technologies to explore and realize radically different kinds of spaces that respond to their environment in real time: responsive kinetic architecture.

 
People: Chris Garvin, Elisabeth Thompson, The Living
Research: Sustainability
Tags: feedback
Start Date: 
5 Apr 2008
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Eyebeam resident artist Jooyoun Paek presents Expand-a-Bag, an inflatable craft workshop.

Eyebeam alums Jenny Broutin, Carmen Trudell and Mouna Andraos will lead a workshop in which participants create personal power stations using alternative energy sources.

The personal powerPlant is a portable device that harnesses electricity through a solar cell and hand crank generator, into a NiMH battery. The device also includes a visual multimeter that monitors the amount of energy stored.

 
Projects: personal powerPlant, Expand-a-Bag
People: Mouna Andraos, JooYoun Paek, Jennifer Broutin, Fluxxlab, Carmen Trudell
Research: Sustainability
Tags: feedback
Start Date: 
8 Apr 2008
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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On the second Tuesday of each month, people who work in the environmental field and anyone interested in environmental issues meet up for a drink at various Manhattan hotspots from 6 – 10PM.

During our FEEDBACK exhibition, Eyebeam hosted Green Drinks in Chelsea.

Network, share info and make friends on Tuesday at Eyebeam!

more...
 
Research: Sustainability
Tags: feedback
Start Date: 
19 Apr 2008
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Feedback artists Natalie Jeremijenko, Leah Gauthier, Brooke Singer, and The Lower East Side Ecology Center presenting workshops during the day.

Natalie Jeremijenko will present noPark.

Natalie Jeremijenko will lead a surface-level noPARK action on a plot of pavement in Chelsea (within a short walk of Eyebeam, exact location TBA the day of the event).

noPARK is a public art project to create “no parking zones" of micro engineered green spaces to prevent storm water run off, use foliage to stabilize the soil, and to provide a durable low maintenance surface cover.

 
Projects: noPARK
People: Natalie Jeremijenko
, Michael Heimbinder, Lower East Side Ecology Center, Leah Gauthier, Emily Gallagher, Brooke Singer
Research: Sustainability, Urban Research
Tags: feedback
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The DrinkPeeDrinkPeeDrinkPee installation at the Eyebeam Feedback exhibition in March 2008.

Drink.Pee.Drink.Pee.Drink.Pee looks at the very personal environmental issues caused by flushing our pee down the toilet: harmful algae blooms in aquatic ecosystems and pee-derived pharmaceuticals in our drinking water. How do we deal with the fact that our planet’s water cycles through a closed system? How do we take control of fact that what's in our pee ends up in the water we drink?

Project Created: 
January 2008
 
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