Re:Group: Beyond Models of Consensus

hacking-couture.com

Moderated by Dustyn Roberts, Eyebeam

Disscussants: Bre Pettis, MakerBot; Giana González, Hacking Couture; Becky Stern, CRAFT and MAKE Magazines, Sternlab

Using Re:Group exhibited projects MakerBot and Hacking Couture as a point of departure, Open Retail will explore the intersection between the engineering and fashion industries, and the ways in which open source practices are influencing them both.

 
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Orange Work - Lexicon

Mandatory Minimum—We Have Moved! is comprised of an urban intervention located adjacent to a Home Depot in Brooklyn and the chain link fence installation at Eyebeam that displays documentation of past Orange Work projects. The Home Depot intervention is comprised of a large printed sign that blandly announces a fictitious increase in the federal minimum wage. The Orange Work method might be summed up as: “Be The State”, by appropriating visual languages to contest issues of spatial dynamics.

Project Created: 
May 2004
 

These video clips (15 total) are from the Re:Group: Beyond Models of Consensus Artists' Breakfast public discussion, with artists John Hawke, Steve Lambert, Takashi Kawashima, Christopher Robbins, Giana Gonzalez, and members of The Institute for Infinitely Small Things. Exhibition curators Paul Amitai, Mushon Zer-Aviv, and Jason Jones were also in attendance.

This video is Clip #5: Steve Lambert on telling bad jokes as a form of protest.

See them all here: http://vimeo.com/album/241104

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MakerBot is an affordable, open source 3D printer rapid prototyping machine developed by Bre Pettis, Zach Hoeken, and Adam Mayer. Build your own MakerBot and it makes things for you, functioning like a personal factory. Digital designs for the MakerBot can be shared on Thingiverse.com, a web-based community initiated by MakerBot Industries, where users post files, document designs, and collaborate on open source hardware.

 

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June 2009
 
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Crisis Map of Haiti represents the most comprehensive and up-to-date crisis map available to the humanitarian community. The information here is mapped in near real time and gathered from reports coming from inside Haiti via: SMS, Web, Email, Radio, Phone, Twitter, Facebook, Television, List-serves, Live streams, and Situation Reports

Volunteers at Ushahidi's Situation Room at the Fletcher School, in Washington DC, Geneva, London and Portland are mapping the majority of the reports submitted to Ushahidi in near real-time. The volunteers then identify GPS coordinates for the reports and geo-tag the reports on the Ushahidi map. Each report is first read at least once by Situation Room before being published on the map. This Ushahidi deployment represents a joint initiative with members of the International Network of Crisis Mappers. All this information published under Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike).

Project Created: 
May 2008
 
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During the 2000 U.S. presidential election, Vote-Auction.net offered U.S. citizens an anonymous and quick way to sell their vote to the highest bidder. Because of the threat to the outcome of the election, several U.S. states issued temporary restraining orders for alleged illegal vote trading and consumer fraud. Over 2,500 news media outlets reported on the project. Collaborators: James Baumgartner, Tilmann Singer, Aaron Kaplan, Silver Server, lo-res.org, Oskar Obereder, Christoph Johannes Mutter, hell.com, Bootlab Berlin, Domenico Quaranta.

Project Created: 
May 2000
 
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Ghana Think Tank is solving the problems of the Developed World. Local problems collected from communities in the U.S. and UK are sent to think tanks in Ghana, Cuba, Iran, Serbia, Mexico and El Salvador. The think tanks propose solutions, which are enacted back in the problem community, whether the solutions seem brilliant or embarrassing. This project explores the friction caused when solutions are generated in one context and applied elsewhere.

 

Project Created: 
May 2006
 
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During the UN Climate Change Conference (COP15) in Copenhagen in December 2008, a collaboration venue for artists and climate activist groups was constructed to invite individuals to play “GOOD COP”. With access to the conference site growing increasingly restricted, GOOD COP aimed to make individual voices heard during the critical week of negotiations. The public was invited to come voice their own statements on the GOOD COP stage.

Project Created: 
May 2009
 
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