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Photos: Eyebeam anniversary--geek meets art chic | 3 of 10

 

Sometimes it feels like sharing a flash drive around an office is dangerous enough. The question is, do you feel lucky enough to trust one stuck in a public wall?

Article by Scott Stein

 

View Kaho Abe image in CNET News' 'Ideas and innovation at Silicon Valley art and tech fest (photos)' slideshow - CNET News
Kaho Abe, as part of Eyebeam, a DIY art collective based in New York, has created a Rube Goldberg or Fischli and Weiss-like contraption called the Ticket Machine.

Insert a quarter, and follow the path of the deliberately overengineered gizmo as hacked and discarded electronics perform one step after another, leading to the printing of a ticket. My receipt read "Everything has the potential to become a pancake."

 

Late Tuesday, a group of signatories including Wired magazine editor and DIY Drones' Chris Anderson, Phil Torrone of Make magazine, David Mellis of MIT Media Lab and Arduino, Limor Fried of Adafruit, and Ayah Bdeir of New York's Eyebeam publicly issued a formal definition of open-source hardware.

The basic elements of the standards are as follows: documentation; necessary software; derived works; free redistribution; attribution; no discrimination against persons or groups; no discrimination against fields of endeavor; distribution of license; license must not be specific to a product; license must not restrict other hardware or software; and license must be technology-neutral.

That is a definition that might be considered familiar to many who have read much about free-software licensing.

 
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