GAFFTA

Billed as "Eyebeam / GAFFTA Sound Research Meetup," it was a collaboration with the Manhattan-based organization Eyebeam (eyebeam.org) and GAFFTA in San Francisco to provide people involved in sound an opportunity to discuss their work.

 

Join GAFFTA and Eyebeam in San Fransisco for a Sound Research Group meeting on August 3rd, 6–8PM. Thinkers and makers will be brought together in dialogue with the goal of stimulating new points of overlap and conversation around issues of both production and aesthetics.  Discussion will be centered around projects/initiatives that have grown out of the New York City group, new work by Bay Area artists, as well as a discussion led by Marc Weidenbaum, founder of disquiet.com, around sound-art remix projects he has curated and their intersection with #netlabel culture. 

This is a great opportunity to join the conversation and participate in an ongoing collaboration on developing dialogue around sound art on both the west and east coast.

 
People: Roddy Schrock
Research: Sound
Tags: GAFFTA, sound, sound art
Start Date: 
9 Dec 2010
Hours: 
5PM–8PM PST
Cost: 
Free (donations appreciated)
Venue: 
Gray Area Foundation For the Arts
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Partner Organizations: 
Hacks/Hackers NYC

San Fransisco followers: Please join our program partner Gray Area Foundation for the Arts this Thursday, December 9th from 5pm-8pm for a special evening celebrating 7 projects from last month’s Great Urban Hack weekend which took place simultaneously at Eyebeam in New York and Gray Area in San Francisco.

Date: Thursday December 9, 2010
Time: 5pm-8pm
Admission: Free, but donations are kindly appreciated.
Location: Gray Area Foundation for the Arts 55 Taylor St. San Francisco, CA

 
People: Stephanie Pereira
Research: Education
Tags: GAFFTA, hackathon, hacks/hackers, The Great Urban Hack
Partner Organizations: Hacks/Hackers NYC

The Great Urban Hack Re-Cap by GAFFTA

9:00am on a Saturday morning, groggy strangers looking for loose chairs in Gray Area, some succeeding more than others at initiating conversations surrounding occupations, communities, and the general insanity that was the Giants World Series parade (though most kept these thoughts to themselves). So began the Great Urban Hack in San Francisco.

Add a dark roast and some bagels to the situation above, and a diverse group of programmers, journalists, designers, and academics come alive and begin to collaborate. The task at hand? Go for a walking tour of San Francisco’s dynamic and much-maligned Tenderloin District, speak to people and identify issues, and find out how journalists (hacks) and programmers (hackers) can work together to address those issues.

 
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