BIORHYTHM: music and the body

This is a highly participatory experience, urging visitors to form human chains to create a unique and ever-changing musical performance. Metal chains hanging in the gallery space invite visitors to form links in a musical chain.

Project Created: 
June 2011
 

Have the sounds of your body chopped up, stretched and mangled while immersive visuals shift around the walls. BODY SNATCHER is an audiovisual installation by artists Alex Dowling and Sinéad Meaney that captures and manipulates sounds that visitors create using their bodies. Choose from two themes - toxicity or harmony - and experience an audiovisual display in which the sounds you make are converted into an ever-changing, live sonic sculpture. Elements of infrasound or 'soundless music' are also used to inspire an authentic cross-modal engagement beyond interactive and audiovisual realms.

Project Created: 
June 2011
 
People: Alex Dowling & Sinead Meaney
Project Type: Exhibited Project
Tags: BIORHYTHM: music and the body

Alex Dowling & Sinead Meaney exhibited work as part of Biorhythm: Music and the Body.

Eyebeam CV
2011F
SExhibiting Artist
 
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This triptych is a work by the artist Chaja Hertog made in collaboration with Nir Nadler, and is recreated for the first time in New York City. The InstruMen perform a haunting musical experience created by their physical integration with the instruments they are playing. By slowly moving their bodies the performers build up a soundscape that would be impossible to recreate using conventional instruments. Prepare to be moved and disturbed by this powerful audiovisual work.

Project Created: 
June 2011
 
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You are able to hear due to the way your brain collects and processes the sound waves in the air. Physical motion is turned into chemical signals inside the ear that are sent to the brain. Percussive bones, rippling hairs and moving liquid. Hear, Hear—a collaboration between an artist and a scientist—has created this playful exploration of the world of human hearing.

Project Created: 
June 2011
 
Projects: Hear
People: Papermen
Project Type: Exhibited Project
Tags: BIORHYTHM: music and the body
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This is a collaborative, multi-user audio-visual experience. Sensors in a table and objects combine to create a sonic experience that is different every time a piece is moved. Created by the Music Technology Group at the University Of Pompeu Fabra, Spain, it allows the instrument to be played by simultaneous performers, opening a whole universe of musical possibilities.

Project Created: 
June 2011
 
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You are invited to measure your emotional reaction to music as a part of the an on-going experiment. Does your body like music that you thought you hated? Using heart-rate monitors and galvanic skin response, the experiment reads your physical response to a selection of music samples.

Project Created: 
June 2011
 
Projects: Emotion, Empathy, Music
People: Niall Coghlan
Project Type: Exhibited Project
Tags: BIORHYTHM: music and the body
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The Theremin Inspectors is a mixed-reality visualization experience that enables people to actually see the electromagnetic fields that they interact with every day. Using a theremin—an electronic instrument you play by moving your hands through open space rather than touching controls—the exhibit highlights how the human body can interact with electromagnetic energy to make music. The key feature of the exhibit is a “mixed-reality” video system that shows the performer live in real time, with a data visualization effect that shows an imaginative rendering of the cloud of electromagnetic energy around the instrument.

Project Created: 
June 2011
 
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This shell-like shape encapsulates you within an immersive audiovisual structure. While resonating in surround and tactile sound and delivering specially composed visuals to your eyes, low frequencies are fed through the floor converting sound into vibrations through your body. This installation by the Italian multimedia artist known as TeZ is not for the faint-hearted.

Project Created: 
June 2011
 
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Any gallery needs a chair, but beware of this one. This original 1920s chair has been reconstructed full of sonic charges. Manipulate the voltage-controlled oscillators on the control panel and you will physically experience the power of sound to your personal liking. The intensity is up to you.

Project Created: 
June 2011
 
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