Nova Jiang

(Photo credit: Michelle Calabro)

Eye to Eyebeam is a new series on Eyebeam's artists in residence and fellows. The series will include interviews, photos, and other information and is authored by Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro.

For Eyebeam Fellow Nova Jiang, participatory creativity is everything. From participant-manipulated puppets to a comic book that generates itself, her intricate mechanical projects engage viewers in unexpected ways and lead to shared social events. More importantly, Nova’s work playfully invites viewers to become collaborators in the pieces by adding their own creative thoughts or actions. Intrepid Eyebeam intern Katherine DiPierro sat down with Nova to chat about her work.

 
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ireti olowe is a designer whose interests include technology, storytelling and graphics.

Eyebeam CV
2011F
SIntern
 
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Jed Moch is a student at the University of Michigan studying the HIstory of Art and Economics. He works part time doing brand management with VICE media, and part time at Christie's, learning from the man. In real life, he likes to hang out by the sea, make art and help Nova Jiang with her research.

Eyebeam CV
2011F
SIntern
 
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Julia started her professional career as a structural aerospace engineer. She has worked in aviation for more than five years, designing solutions for damaged airplanes. To maintain a mental balance she juggled creative gigs on the side, including puppet, costume and fashion design. In 2002 she left her job at Delta Air Lines in Atlanta to study Fashion Design at FIT, working part-time as a costume designer and milliner. She returned to engineering and joined JetBlue Airways in 2004, launching her fashion label Molly Spinach. Winter 2009 marked the debut of her new high-end outerwear label, Lia Lintern. She is currently collaborating with Eyebeam Fellow Nova Jiang.

Eyebeam CV
2011F
SIntern
 
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Jacob Tonski is a pragmatic optimist whose creative work explores balance as an inherently dynamic process.

A self-adjusting platform makes everyone the same height, probing ideas of equality and the origins of power. A larger-than-life top spins about the room, wobbling through themes of pleasure, danger, youth and decay.

These and other human-scale objects, both amusing and threatening, find an uncanny identity between toys and tools. The forces of time and gravity serve in these works as foils for those things we are powerless to direct in our lives, and with which we must instead dance and negotiate.

 
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Leonard Tirulnikov

Leonard Tirulnikov is a person. After past lives in music and journalism, he is currently studying Cognitive Science at the University of Pennsylvania and doing most of the things you can do with computers, to varying degrees of success. He is currently collaborating with Eyebeam Fellow Nova Jiang.

 

Eyebeam CV
2011F
SIntern
 
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