On Being Dead / On My Deadwork / My Work is Dead

Deadwork is invisible work; deadwork is virtual work. When there is
nothing but the image and the memory of the image, there is deadwork. When
the producing tribe cannot read, can only reinterpret, there is deadwork.
Deadwork does not enter the cycle of capital; it no longer exists; it
never has existed. Deadwork is deadly work; it is the death of the
producing culture. The culture knows it. The culture is ready for its

My work is dead. It is not spoken. It is invisible in the building at
Eyebeam and disappears as a future anterior online. In the space, it
huddles. In the space it hides in cracks in crevices, in the remains of an
s/m parlor perhaps, in the remains of a parking garage perhaps, in the
remains if a silent film studio perhaps. The building is scarred; my work
devolves, unscars, dissolves. It is a shadow on a scar. It is the huddle

People: Alan Sondheim
Tags: Work, pain, death, dead

Elusive Electricity (Ejet, Ejet)
in collaboration with
Hirumi Nanayakkara
and Bassam Jalgha
July 2011
260cm x 70 cm
Neon, Steel, Motion Sensor,
Cables, Custom Electronics

EE is an interactive installation that examines people’s interaction with Lebanese electricity, an infamously broken infrastructure that they have learnt to live without, or in spite of. Over the past 25 years, electricity shortages in Lebanon have reached 20 hours a day, creating a sinister imaginary persona that commands life across social, financial and political lines, and seems to constantly play hard to get.

People: Ayah Bdeir
Tags: Work

Screenprint on birch plywood box and 4 card stock hangtags
Edition of 80
Produced by The Present Group


wood, aluminum, electrical
53in x 80in x 8in

Represented here as an animated gif. Pardon the pixelation we sacrifice for the animation.

Shown at “If These Walls Could Talk” at Marine Art Salon and Charlie James Gallery


Trust Me
wood, aluminum, electrical
28in x 50in x 6in

Shown at “If These Walls Could Talk” at Marine Art Salon and Charlie James Gallery

Video to come…


photo of Steve Lambert by Jennifer Sharpe

Free as in Freedom and Free as in Free Beer: a talk and walking tour with jokes

A presentation of the various definitions of “Free,” from human liberation, the law, freedom of movement, to economics.


In the summer of 2010, we asked artists and curators worldwide to record themselves responding and commenting on the following questions:

What are or should be the taboos honored by cultural institutions?
Why should public funds be spent to support artwork that might offend some segment of the general public?
Does “concern for the community” justify (self)censorship?
What alternative institutional models are emerging in the face of restrictive conditions attached to public funding?

The responses and creative comments of artists and curators worldwide are collected in Power, Taboo and the Artist, an ongoing video project produced by the National Coalition Against Censorship and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School.


When using PayPal for the Utopia Letterpress Print I want people to set their own price. PayPal offers a “Donate” button, but I wasn’t asking for donations. People are purchasing something, they’re just setting their own price for it. These PayPal buttons would not work for Karl Marx.

“From each according to his ability, to each according to his need” -Karl Marx

So I made my own buttons. And you can too!

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