hardware

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Pushing the boundary of fashion to the absolute limit.

Wearable Weapons awaken the power of vulnerability. 

Wearable Weapons is currently building visual and interactive wearable costumes for an entertainer or singer to wear during a performance or music video.

Right now we are focusing on building a new series of collars with hacked Violet Wands connected to software that pulses mini-electrical arcs through voice interaction.  This is part of a larger series of interactive costumes built with different forms of electricity, fire, sound sensors, open source software, hardware, plant fibers, confiscated scissors from airport security, recycled razor blades, and zip ties.

You might ask... and what are Violet Wands?

Project Created: 
November 2011
 

I am feeling a great amount of social responsibility while doing simple tasks like buying urls and testing regulators. Think it's time for a walk by the river.

http://www.signalstrengthproject.com

 

 
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Signal Strength is a project to advance mobile democracy. It consists of modules for ad-hoc social networking that let people in an urban area interact offline, leveraging their mobile phones for untraceable communications.

Project Created: 
June 2011
 

After many many months of discussion, writing, and debate, version 1.0 of the Open Source Hardware Definition and statement of principles has been released!

This is BIG NEWS, for everyone who does open source hardware we finally have something we can put on our pages, stamp on our boards and say THIS is open source hardware! Of course this is just a first step, and we look forward to working on next versions, but still, this is a very important step for our community.

 

Last month, when Microsoft launched Kinect, an accessory that lets players control Xbox 360 games by moving their bodies, Limor Fried posted a challenge on her company’s blog. Adafruit Industries, which sells do-it-yourself electronics kits, would give $1,000 to the first person to unlock Kinect’s sophisticated motion sensors from the Xbox so that any tinkerer could repurpose the technology for such projects as building robots. In a week Adafruit had a winner, a Spanish engineer who got Kinect to work with his laptop just hours after it was released in Europe. “Now it’s unlocked for creativity,” Fried wrote.

 

Posted by Soulskill on Saturday October 30, @05:56PM
from the peer-to-peer-sneakernet dept.
Okian Warrior writes "Aram Bartholl is building a series of USB dead drops in New York City. Billed as 'an anonymous, offline, peer to peer file-sharing network in public space,' he has embedded USB sticks as file cache devices throughout the city. Bartholl says, 'I am "injecting" USB flash drives into walls, buildings and curbs accessible to anybody in public space. You are invited to go to these places (so far 5 in NYC) to drop or find files on a dead drop. Plug your laptop to a wall, house or pole to share your files and data.' Current locations (more to come) include: 87 3rd Avenue, Brooklyn, NY (Makerbot), Empire Fulton Ferry Park, Brooklyn, NY (Dumbo), 235 Bowery, NY (New Museum), Union Square, NY (Subway Station 14th St), and West 21st Street, NY (Eyebeam)"

 
Start Date: 
23 Sep 2010
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
New York Hall of Science
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The Open Hardware Summit will be a venue to discuss and draw attention to the vibrant open source hardware movement currently happening. The event is happening around MakerFaire NY, in partnership with Buglabs, MakerFaire, Creative Commons, littleBits, Eyebeam, Htink.

With an amazing lineup from academia, industry, DIY shop and open hardware stars, the event promises to be incredible. The lineup includes: Arduino, Sparkfun, Evil Mad Science, Adafruit, Make, NASA, MITre, Eyebeam, OHANDA, Creative Commons, Texas Instruments, DIYLILCNC, FSF and many others.

For the full schedule, please visit: www.openhardwaresummit.org/schedule.
Tickets are at $40, and $25 for students, artists and non-profits. Tickets include breakfast, lunch, and cocktail, free one day pass to Maker Faire and a geeky goodiebag!

 

Late Tuesday, a group of signatories including Wired magazine editor and DIY Drones' Chris Anderson, Phil Torrone of Make magazine, David Mellis of MIT Media Lab and Arduino, Limor Fried of Adafruit, and Ayah Bdeir of New York's Eyebeam publicly issued a formal definition of open-source hardware.

The basic elements of the standards are as follows: documentation; necessary software; derived works; free redistribution; attribution; no discrimination against persons or groups; no discrimination against fields of endeavor; distribution of license; license must not be specific to a product; license must not restrict other hardware or software; and license must be technology-neutral.

That is a definition that might be considered familiar to many who have read much about free-software licensing.

 

Be a part of history! Support the cause and open source fabrication. Pledge now!

Laser cutters are a key technology for making things.

Remember when people couldn't make their own videos, CDs or print out photos? Me neither (at least we try to forget). In many areas of media, the last century was quite the read-only culture where a few gatekeepers would sit on the means to produce everything. Not the best situation for creativity or for people with lots of cool ideas but no cash.

How can you help? Your pledge is what makes this project possible and the more funded the community, the faster we can make this happen.

 
Start Date: 
17 Mar 2010
Hours: 
1pm - 7pm
Cost: 
Free
Venue: 
Eyebeam
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Wednesday March 17, 2010
1:30 - 7pm
Eyebeam Art and Technology Center

OVERVIEW

 
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